Exercise Rhymes, LLC © 2007-2013   

Exercise Rhymes

Rhymes that make exercising fun! 

®

In the Classroom & Therapy

Exercise Rhymes™ are fun playful rhymes and exercises for adults to do with young children. Exercise Rhymes enhance a child’s ability to learn while promoting fitness, coordination, balance & flexibility, along with memory, rhyming, imagination, confidence & social skills. Preschool and primary elementary teachers use them for fitness breaks in class, helping kids to refocus their attention. The combined rhyme and movement builds mine-body connections that reinforce learning.  Rhyming is recommended by reading specialists to help provide a good foundation for reading. Exercise Rhymes provide a variety of physical activities that can be mixed and matched during any given exercise session. In a short time, the rhymes become a cue for children to perform the physical exercises and children love to fill in the rhyming words.

 

Exercise Rhymes have therapeutic uses for children with special needs. They are effective in educational therapy because the combined rhyme and exercise stimulate both motor and language centers of the brain, and the rhymes help with the brain’s timing mechanism. Pediatric therapists have stated they get significant eye contact and interaction while using Exercise Rhymes with autistic children and they are an excellent resource for parents to continue therapy at home. 

 

The exercises themselves benefit the parents, teachers, and caregivers as much as the kids, and they really are a fun way to not only exercise but also spend time together. Kids love to rhyme and pretend and never think twice about the exercise. Doing Exercise Rhymes promotes the concept that exercise can be easily incorporated into daily life, either sustained, or with short bursts of activity a few times a day. Exercise Rhymes are ideal for busy parents who want to incorporate exercise into their family activities.

University of Illinois research finds “…strong relationship between academic achievement and fitness scores.”

(Mitchell, Melissa (2004). Physically fit children
 appear to do better in classroom, researchers say)

 

“…children learn through movement... it is through movement that children develop social, emotional, and cognitive skills.”

(Eloise Elliott, PhD, Steve Sanders, PhD (2002). Keep Children Moving: Promoting Physical Activity throughout the Curriculum)

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